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Suidobashi Bridge and Surugadai

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Suidobashi Bridge and Surugadai
£ 150.00

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  • Japanese Woodblock Print - Suidobashi Bridge and Surugadai

  • Artist: Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858)

  • From the series "One Hundred Famous Views of Edo"

  • Dimensions: H 37 x W 25 cm

  • Original woodblock print

  • Handcrafted & Made in Japan


In dramatic compositions of close-up views or in gentle distant views, Hiroshige presented the varied views and experiences that his beloved native city offered its residents. Interesting topographical features - rivers, bridges, hills temples - all showed different aspects depending on changing weather, time of day and the season of the year.

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Hiroshige depicts carp-shaped streamers for boy's festival over Kanda River and the city of Edo dramatically. Carp-shaped streamer known as "Koinobori" are hung to celebrate the boys, who are supposed to grow as strong as the carps that can swim up streams.

Hiroshige's last monumental series, One Hundred Famous Views of Edo, was published in February 1856 and completed in August 1858. It comprises 121 prints, three of which were added after his death by his student Hiroshige II (1826-1869). Originally planned as 100 images, the series gained such popularity and public demand that it was continued. But toward its completion, its master suddenly died from cholera. The series continued to be issued; thus, there are early impressions and later versions that differ considerably in colours, quality, and even in designs. It is regrettable that Hiroshige died aged 62, not having exhausted his potential, but perhaps also a great consolation for the lovers of his art that the master ended his career of more than 40 years at the peak of his artistic creativity.

In dramatic compositions of close-up views or in gentle distant views, Hiroshige presented the varied views and experiences that his beloved native city offered its residents. Interesting topographical features - rivers, bridges, hills temples - all showed different aspects depending on changing weather, time of day and the season of the year.

 

All printing are done by hand, using the traditional woodblock process. The printing stage is both time-consuming and extremely delicate, because each colour in the print must be printed from its own block. The printer must align the print perfectly through several stages of the printing process. All prints are produced on handmade Japanese Kozo (paper mulberry) paper. Inks are made from natural dyes. All of the material used are traditional Ukiyo-e.

Through careful research, the use of traditional techniques and materials, and the highest standards of craftmanship, the artist are able to reproduce original Ukiyo-e with the highest level of accuracy.

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